Canvas animation timeframe keyframe

9 Mind-Blowing Canvas Demos

The <canvas> element has been a revelation for the visual experts among our ranks.  Canvas provides the means for incredible and efficient animations with the added bonus of no Flash; these developers can flash their awesome JavaScript skills instead.  Here are nine unbelievable canvas demos that will make your jaw drop!

Hospy.co

1.  Zen Photon Garden

The Zen Photon Garden demo is the epitome of mind-blowing.  This epic canvas demo allows for drawing on the canvas with reactive light streams, allowing the user to see the end product of their new line will be.  Even better, this demo allows you to save and load output.

Canvas Demo

2.  Tear-able Cloth

The Tear-able Cloth demo has set the web alight over the past few months and for good reason.  This demo is the smoothest you’ll see and considering the task it accomplishes and the how little code is involved, it will take your breath away.  There’s more to it than simple pulling and physics — the animation and needing to account for pulling hard enough to elegantly animate a tear makes this demo even more amazing.  A perfect illustration of canvas’ capabilities.

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3.  Particles

It’s hard describe this demo outside of “ftw”.  This demo animates color, position, connection lines, and opacity, all the while animating smooth as a baby’s….it’s really smooth.  Marvel at this beast.

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4.  Motion Graphic Typeface

I wish I could describe how this effect is done but I can’t.  I see that each letter is comprised of different image data, but that’s about it.  What I can say is this animation is absolutely mind-blowing, as letters animate into place and the aspect at which you see the text depends on your mouse position.  Shocking.

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5.  Motion Graphic Typeface II

As if the first wasn’t impressive enough, the second MGT demo is one worthy of a Pulitzer Prize. I’d give up my second, third, and eighth-born to be this clever.  Not only does the text animate but there’s an incredible colored blur that’s part of the animation.  This demo is truly a sight to behold.

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6.  Gestures + Reveal.JS

Now only did this demo blow my mind, but it also blew my CPU.  This exercise uses your device’s camera and microphone to move a cube of data based on gestures.  If you have a MacBook Pro, you shouldn’t die before trying this out.  Start the demo and flail your arms about — you’ll se the demo content move about and then start believing in spirits.

7.  Free Rider 2

You can’t cover the awesomeness of canvas without including at least one game.  Canvas is arguably the future of HTML5 gaming, as Firefox OS will soon demonstrate.  This brilliant but simple bike game shows that canvas is ready for prime time!

Canvas Demo

8.  30,000 Particles

The 30k Particles demo incorporates some really awesome stuff:  circular shapes (radius), animated exploding and returning particles, and mouse listeners to allow the user to control the explosions.  An excellent example of interactivity and logic.

9.  HTML5 Video Destruction

I must pay homage to one of the first truly eye-catching canvas demos I saw — an explodable canvas video.  You click the video and pieces explode, yet the video keeps playing its segment/position during the explosion while it returns to its original position.  An inspiring demo to to all of us.

Canvas Demo

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Youtube Vimeo on click play pause api javascript

Play and Pause Buttons for YouTube and Vimeo Videos (via Their APIs)

Sometimes you just need to start a video playing by some user interaction on the page other than clicking right on that video itself. Perhaps a “Play Video” button of your own creation lives on your page and you want to start that video when that button is clicked. That’s JavaScript territory. And if that video is a YouTube or Vimeo video, we’ll need to make use of the APIs they provide. No problem.

For these examples, we’ll assume you’ve already picked out a video and you’re going to put it on the page in an

Tutorial source: CSS-Tricks

For YouTube

1. Make sure the iframe src URL has ?enablejsapi=1 at the end

Like this:

<iframe src="//www.youtube.com/embed/FKWwdQu6_ok?enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen id="video"></iframe>

I also put an id attribute on the iframe so it will be easy and fast to target with JavaScript.

2. Load the YouTube Player API

You could just link to it in a <script>, but all their documentation shows loading it async style, which is always good for third-party scripts, so let’s do that:

// Inject YouTube API script
var tag = document.createElement('script');
tag.src = "//www.youtube.com/player_api";
var firstScriptTag = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];
firstScriptTag.parentNode.insertBefore(tag, firstScriptTag);

3. Create a global function called onYouTubePlayerAPIReady

This is the callback function that the YouTube API will call when it’s ready. It needs to be named this.

function onYouTubePlayerAPIReady() {

}

It’s likely you have some structure to your JavaScript on your page, so generally I’d recommend just having this function call another function that is inside your organizational system and get going on the right track right away. But for this tutorial, let’s just keep it soup-y.

4. Create the Player object

This is the object that has the ability to control that video. We’ll create it using the id attribute on that iframe in our HTML.

var player;

function onYouTubePlayerAPIReady() {
  // create the global player from the specific iframe (#video)
  player = new YT.Player('video', {
    events: {
      // call this function when player is ready to use
      'onReady': onPlayerReady
    }
  });
}

Another callback!

5. Create the “player ready” callback and bind events

We named this function when we created the player object. It will automatically be passed the event object, in which event.target is the player, but since we already have a global for it let’s just use that.

Here we bind a simple click event to an element on the page with the id #play-button (whatever custom button you want) and call the player object’s playVideo method.

function onPlayerReady(event) {
  
  // bind events
  var playButton = document.getElementById("play-button");
  playButton.addEventListener("click", function() {
    player.playVideo();
  });
  
  var pauseButton = document.getElementById("pause-button");
  pauseButton.addEventListener("click", function() {
    player.pauseVideo();
  });
  
}

All Together Now

And that’ll do it! Here’s a demo:

I used a little SVG templating in there for the buttons just for fun.

For Vimeo

1. Make sure the iframe src URL has ?api=1 at the end

<iframe src="//player.vimeo.com/video/80312270?api=1" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen allowfullscreen id="video"></iframe>

I also put an id attribute on the iframe so it will be easy and fast to target with JavaScript.

2. Load the “froogaloop” JS library

The Vimeo player API actually works by sending commands through postMessage right to the iframe. You don’t need the froogaloop library to do that, but postMessage has some inherent complexities that this library (by Vimeo themselves) makes way easier. Plus it’s only 1.8kb so I’d recommend it.

<script src="froogaloop.min.js"></script>

3. Create the player object

var iframe = document.getElementById('video');

// $f == Froogaloop
var player = $f(iframe);

We target the iframe by the id attribute we added. Then we create the player using the special froogaloop $f.

4. Bind events

All we have to do now is call methods on that player object to play and pause the video, so let’s call them when our play and pause buttons are clicked.

var playButton = document.getElementById("play-button");
playButton.addEventListener("click", function() {
  player.api("play");
});

var pauseButton = document.getElementById("pause-button");
pauseButton.addEventListener("click", function() {
  player.api("pause");
});

All Together Now

That’ll do it for Vimeo. Here’s a demo:


You can do much more with the APIs for both of these services. It can be pretty fun, just dive in!

Some handy Regular Expressions you should know

Background Info on Regular Expressions

This is what Wikipedia has to say about them:

In computing, regular expressions provide a concise and flexible means for identifying strings of text of interest, such as particular characters, words, or patterns of characters. Regular expressions (abbreviated as regex or regexp, with plural forms regexes, regexps, or regexen) are written in a formal language that can be interpreted by a regular expression processor, a program that either serves as a parser generator or examines text and identifies parts that match the provided specification.

Now, that doesn’t really tell me much about the actual patterns. The regexes I’ll be going over today contains characters such as \w, \s, \1, and many others that represent something totally different from what they look like.

If you’d like to learn a little about regular expressions before you continue reading this article, I’d suggest watching the Regular Expressions for Dummies screencast series.

The eight regular expressions we’ll be going over today will allow you to match a(n): username, password, email, hex value (like #fff or #000), slug, URL, IP address, and an HTML tag. As the list goes down, the regular expressions get more and more confusing. The pictures for each regex in the beginning are easy to follow, but the last four are more easily understood by reading the explanation.

The key thing to remember about regular expressions is that they are almost read forwards and backwards at the same time. This sentence will make more sense when we talk about matching HTML tags.

Note: The delimiters used in the regular expressions are forward slashes, “/”. Each pattern begins and ends with a delimiter. If a forward slash appears in a regex, we must escape it with a backslash: “\/”.


1. Matching a Username

Matching a username

Pattern:

  1. /^[a-z0-9_-]{3,16}$/

Description:

We begin by telling the parser to find the beginning of the string (^), followed by any lowercase letter (a-z), number (0-9), an underscore, or a hyphen. Next, {3,16} makes sure that are at least 3 of those characters, but no more than 16. Finally, we want the end of the string ($).

String that matches:

my-us3r_n4m3

String that doesn’t match:

th1s1s-wayt00_l0ngt0beausername (too long)


2. Matching a Password

Matching a password

Pattern:

  1. /^[a-z0-9_-]{6,18}$/

Description:

Matching a password is very similar to matching a username. The only difference is that instead of 3 to 16 letters, numbers, underscores, or hyphens, we want 6 to 18 of them ({6,18}).

String that matches:

myp4ssw0rd

String that doesn’t match:

mypa$$w0rd (contains a dollar sign)


3. Matching a Hex Value

Matching a hex valud

Pattern:

  1. /^#?([a-f0-9]{6}|[a-f0-9]{3})$/

Description:

We begin by telling the parser to find the beginning of the string (^). Next, a number sign is optional because it is followed a question mark. The question mark tells the parser that the preceding character — in this case a number sign — is optional, but to be “greedy” and capture it if it’s there. Next, inside the first group (first group of parentheses), we can have two different situations. The first is any lowercase letter between a and f or a number six times. The vertical bar tells us that we can also have three lowercase letters between a and f or numbers instead. Finally, we want the end of the string ($).

The reason that I put the six character before is that parser will capture a hex value like #ffffff. If I had reversed it so that the three characters came first, the parser would only pick up #fff and not the other three f’s.

String that matches:

#a3c113

String that doesn’t match:

#4d82h4 (contains the letter h)


4. Matching a Slug

Matching a slug

Pattern:

  1. /^[a-z0-9-]+$/

Description:

You will be using this regex if you ever have to work with mod_rewrite and pretty URL’s. We begin by telling the parser to find the beginning of the string (^), followed by one or more (the plus sign) letters, numbers, or hyphens. Finally, we want the end of the string ($).

String that matches:

my-title-here

String that doesn’t match:

my_title_here (contains underscores)


5. Matching an Email

Matching an email

Pattern:

  1. /^([a-z0-9_\.-]+)@([\da-z\.-]+)\.([a-z\.]{2,6})$/

Description:

We begin by telling the parser to find the beginning of the string (^). Inside the first group, we match one or more lowercase letters, numbers, underscores, dots, or hyphens. I have escaped the dot because a non-escaped dot means any character. Directly after that, there must be an at sign. Next is the domain name which must be: one or more lowercase letters, numbers, underscores, dots, or hyphens. Then another (escaped) dot, with the extension being two to six letters or dots. I have 2 to 6 because of the country specific TLD’s (.ny.us or .co.uk). Finally, we want the end of the string ($).

String that matches:

john@doe.com

String that doesn’t match:

john@doe.something (TLD is too long)


6. Matching a URL

Matching a url

Pattern:

  1. /^(https?:\/\/)?([\da-z\.-]+)\.([a-z\.]{2,6})([\/\w \.-]*)*\/?$/

Description:

This regex is almost like taking the ending part of the above regex, slapping it between “http://” and some file structure at the end. It sounds a lot simpler than it really is. To start off, we search for the beginning of the line with the caret.

The first capturing group is all option. It allows the URL to begin with “http://”, “https://”, or neither of them. I have a question mark after the s to allow URL’s that have http or https. In order to make this entire group optional, I just added a question mark to the end of it.

Next is the domain name: one or more numbers, letters, dots, or hypens followed by another dot then two to six letters or dots. The following section is the optional files and directories. Inside the group, we want to match any number of forward slashes, letters, numbers, underscores, spaces, dots, or hyphens. Then we say that this group can be matched as many times as we want. Pretty much this allows multiple directories to be matched along with a file at the end. I have used the star instead of the question mark because the star says zero or more, not zero or one. If a question mark was to be used there, only one file/directory would be able to be matched.

Then a trailing slash is matched, but it can be optional. Finally we end with the end of the line.

String that matches:

http://net.tutsplus.com/about

String that doesn’t match:

http://google.com/some/file!.html (contains an exclamation point)


7. Matching an IP Address

Matching an IP address

Pattern:

  1. /^(?:(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.){3}(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)$/

Description:

Now, I’m not going to lie, I didn’t write this regex; I got it from here. Now, that doesn’t mean that I can’t rip it apart character for character.

The first capture group really isn’t a captured group because

  1. ?:

was placed inside which tells the parser to not capture this group (more on this in the last regex). We also want this non-captured group to be repeated three times — the {3} at the end of the group. This group contains another group, a subgroup, and a literal dot. The parser looks for a match in the subgroup then a dot to move on.

The subgroup is also another non-capture group. It’s just a bunch of character sets (things inside brackets): the string “25″ followed by a number between 0 and 5; or the string “2″ and a number between 0 and 4 and any number; or an optional zero or one followed by two numbers, with the second being optional.

After we match three of those, it’s onto the next non-capturing group. This one wants: the string “25″ followed by a number between 0 and 5; or the string “2″ with a number between 0 and 4 and another number at the end; or an optional zero or one followed by two numbers, with the second being optional.

We end this confusing regex with the end of the string.

String that matches:

73.60.124.136 (no, that is not my IP address :P)

String that doesn’t match:

256.60.124.136 (the first group must be “25″ and a number between zero and five)


8. Matching an HTML Tag

Matching an HTML tag

Pattern:

  1. /^<([a-z]+)([^<]+)*(?:>(.*)<\/\1>|\s+\/>)$/

Description:

One of the more useful regexes on the list. It matches any HTML tag with the content inside. As usually, we begin with the start of the line.

First comes the tag’s name. It must be one or more letters long. This is the first capture group, it comes in handy when we have to grab the closing tag. The next thing are the tag’s attributes. This is any character but a greater than sign (>). Since this is optional, but I want to match more than one character, the star is used. The plus sign makes up the attribute and value, and the star says as many attributes as you want.

Next comes the third non-capture group. Inside, it will contain either a greater than sign, some content, and a closing tag; or some spaces, a forward slash, and a greater than sign. The first option looks for a greater than sign followed by any number of characters, and the closing tag. \1 is used which represents the content that was captured in the first capturing group. In this case it was the tag’s name. Now, if that couldn’t be matched we want to look for a self closing tag (like an img, br, or hr tag). This needs to have one or more spaces followed by “/>”.

The regex is ended with the end of the line.

 

Source: nettutplus.com

jquery Draggable plugin

Lightweight Draggable() jQuery plugin

A  simple lightweight jQuery plugin that adds cross-browser dragging support.

(jquery draggable plugin)

Supports Axis restriction, Parent Boundary restriction.

Demonstration: http://jsfiddle.net/yelton/2TQgB/

Download on Github: https://github.com/scazzy/jQuery-Draggable

If your application requires dragging of elements, creating scrollbars, or anything that can make your app look sexy sticky and dragging, here’s the thing for you.

Unlike Jquery UI’s draggable plugin, that is heavy for your application, (and that requires you to download the pre-requisites to use just the dragging functionality, this one is lightweight (just 1.1Kb minified).

In order to use the plugin, simply bind the “draggable” event to an element.

Here is an example:

<br /><br />// Basic dragging a div<br />$("div").draggable();<br />
&lt;/pre&gt;<br />// Restricting dragging to an axis<br />$("div").draggable({<br /><%%KEEPWHITESPACE%%>  axis: 'x'<br />});<br />
&lt;/pre&gt;<br />// Restricting dragging to it's parent container (boundary)<br />$("div").draggable({<br /><%%KEEPWHITESPACE%%>  containParent: true<br />});<br />

Beginner Resources to HTML5, JavaScript, jQuery, Backbone, and CSS3

A BEGINNER’S JOURNEY

HTML5

So, it is pretty obvious that you are going to need to learn HTML5 if you are doing to do front-end web development. From my experience most developers regardless of their language of choice know the basics of HTML. What they may or may not know are all the newer semantic tags, cross-browser tricks, and native JavaScript APIs.

There is plenty to learn in HTML5 without getting into the JavaScript APIs just yet. Once you learn JavaScript and feel comfortable in it, that may be the best time to tackle topics such as Geolocation, Web Sockets, Canvas, IndexDB, Web Workers, etc…

Resources

JAVASCRIPT

Even if you think you know JavaScript it might behoove you to go back and learn it from the beginning. A common danger is that developers think it looks just like their back-end language of choice (C, C++, C#, or Java) that they don’t invest time to learn how it is different.

JavaScript is a dynamic and functional language, which is considerably different than C# or Java for example. So, please take your time and pick up the language. If you don’t learn it appropriately you will invariably run into barriers down the road due to lack of understanding.

Resources

JQUERY

The jQuery library has been around for several years and has catapulted as one of the most used tools in the web developer’s belt. The reason for its vast usage is that it solves many of the cross-browser issues that creep up during development. The library is popular for both web developers and web designers. The community around jQuery is amazing and there are tons of jQuery plugins to choose from.

Resources

BACKBONE.JS

If you find yourself writing more and more JavaScript and jQuery then you may want to consider picking up Backbone.js to help you organize your web application. This library is also a great fit for Single Page Applications (SPA). Backbone.js uses the familiar MVC/MVP concepts of Models, Collections, Views, and Routers. In addition there is a nice Event model, History support, and a Sync mechanism. The community for Backbone.js is also very large and you can find many extensions and plugins to fit your needs.

Resources

CSS3

You may or may not have experience with CSS. Brushing up on CSS concepts would be a good thing. If you already feed proficient at CSS1-2, then you should pick up CSS3 as well. A lot of features have been added recently that is in most modern browsers. There are many things that you can do in CSS3 now where you used to use JavaScript or custom images.

Resources

FEATURE DETECTION

Inevitably you’ll need to support browsers that don’t support the native feature you are trying to use. Thankfully you can use Feature Detection to determine if the browser you are in implements that feature and if it doesn’t then you can provide functionality to mimic that feature (a.k.a. a polyfill or shim).

Resources

RESPONSIVE WEB DESIGN

Instead of implementing a different UI for mobile devices, tablets, and desktop browsers you can use responsive web design techniques to provide one experience that restructures the UI according to its size.

Resources

CONCLUSION

Hopefully the above resources will get you started in your transition to front-end web development. There is a lot to learn, but it is an exciting space that changes frequently. Having a desire to learn is a good trait to have in this field.

If you have any resources that you think I missed please add them in the comments and I’ll try to update the lists above if I think they are appropriate.